All posts tagged: oil painting

Original Painting Auction to Raise Funds for WIRES

I have a piece named ‘SOS’ up for auction on eBayin aid of WIRES (NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service)¬†which is currently in crisis due to the bushfires raging through Australia. WIRES actively rehbailitate and preserve Australian wildlife, and will be inundated and working tirelessly at this time. 23 people have lost their lives, 12 million acres of land has been devastated, large scale evacuations are taking place, and half a billion wildlife has perished. They fear that the worst is still to come. In many rural areas, volunteers are working with little resources, risking their lives and health to keep the fires at bay and keep people safe. Teams are working to help slow moving wildlife and get them to safety, treating burns and wounds and caring for them when they have nowhere to escape. The original painting is based on a well loved piece named Glory which celebrates the bountiful abundance of out beautiful natural world. The gold leaf droplets symbolise the nourishment that nature gifts us. This abstract and surrealist piece …

My Decade in Review!

I took this time to reflect on the past 10 years, and I started writing about it privately, and thought what the hell, share it with the world! So here are the last 10 year in almost Tolkein-esque like detail (minus the elves) Enjoy! 2010 I was 21. This was the year I graduated with a BA Honours in Fine Art. A course that has incredibly little to do with what I do now, but probably valuable in terms of the theoretical side of art, which I excelled at for the essays. Ironically, studio time and physically creating the art was not my forte on this course. I completed the final half of my final year at University, a 10 000 word dissertation on how the studio environment affects the outcome of the art. I also struggled with crippling anxiety, panic attacks almost on a weekly, sometimes daily basis, and the impending dread of post-university life. Once graduated I got a job back in my hometown, and would get the train on weekends to visit …

Keep your art practices sacred. You’ll never look back.

A love note from me to all the creatives, who work from the soul and have succumbed at times to the negative chatter around them. A lot of what people do, which we are all guilty of at some time or another, is resting too much consideration on the opinions of those around us. Our ego is so hugely interlinked with our art practices, we are laying out our talents and often our thoughts and feelings in order to showcase what we can do. Two things that cannot co-exist for your creative practices is the ego alongside the freedom of self expression. It is too volatile. People put others down to their face, or behind their back. Both equally as cutting. It can be their way of a cheap win. A quick rush of feeling better and above someone else. If they cannot or do not care to go out and create themselves it is the only way they can involve themselves in a way they feel on top. In order to protect your creativity …

Adam Handling Chelsea – The Art Of Belmond

Last year I began a project that could only be described as a dream come true. To create bespoke artwork for an impossibly beautiful hotel in the heart of London. In a complete whirlwind of compositional sketches, late night note jotting, ideas bursting at the seams, scouring the internet for historical records and deciphering latin names for all kinds of botanical specimens… I set to work on a creating bespoke commissioned original oil paintings for the newly renovated building that would become one of the most lavish, expensive and artistically drenched hotels imaginable. The Belmond group have renovated a building, where the room marked 118 is famously the room where Oscar Wilde was arrested. The hotel is owned by the Cadogan family, a lineage steeped in rich history as the ancestors of Hans Sloane, the 18th century physician, naturalist, adventurer and collector noted for bequeathing his collection of 71 000 items to the British nation, thus providing the foundation of the British Museum, the British Library and the Natural History Museum. He traveled to Jamaica …

Lets stay connected

Lets stay connected. You and I have been connected for a little while. You actually see into every corner of my soul, if you do in fact look at my artwork. Scary. Sharing my sacred art space has been something I have felt more strongly towards for a long time now! From starting communities on FaceBook to trying to share more information on the how behind my artwork, for anyone interested in the creating side of my art. Whilst also adding additional information for the people who just enjoy the viewing or the more theoretical side. I know from my own experience that when I had made the decision to make my art more of a prominent feature in my life, the social media profiles of other artists were my biggest source of inspiration and drive. I waited for their next post, and I hoped for more information of the how. Be it how they created, how they marketed, anything! Because of the ever changing social media landscape and the difficulty staying connected to the …

Lately…

It has been such a long time since I last wrote a blog post (1 year in fact) and I thought I would revive and refresh with a few teaser close ups of my newest collection that I’ve been working so hard on. But first allow me to explain my absence from writing (one of my favourite forms of expression alongside painting) and what I have coming up that warrants a blog post or two! The last blog post I wrote, I typed with a sleeping baby strapped to me in a baby sling, who had been walked around the kitchen table over and over whilst I sang Bohemian Rhapsody (not sure why, but this method seemed to work occasionally) until he fell asleep and freed up my hands somewhat. I could have cooked, but this was too loud or messy. I could have painted but the arm movements seemed to disturb him. So typing it was! Fast forward a year and the tiny sleeping baby is a walking, babbling, giggling, dancing and relentlessly curious …

Some of what I have worked on in 2018

2018 has kicked off to quite an eventful start, as I work on a collection, I have meanwhile worked on some smaller pieces that has helped me correct some of my skills with intricate details. I love to work large scale, and often find it difficult to change technique to fit a smaller canvas. Time for me has been particularly limited and there are certainly not enough hours in the day, but when I can I am painting, and trying to keep up the challenge of changing things up to better myself. This in part isn’t just trying new techniques, compositions and styles, but revising old ones and improving upon them! Here are just a few of what I have worked on this year, as well as commissions, great (white shark) and small! Each piece below is oil on wood panel, this is the way I mostly work! For any further information on any of my works, contact info@wishboneart.co.uk to be directed to a gallery near you! I also recently asked for what you would …

How I began selling my Art

Selling artwork is not always an artist’s perogative. However not everyone has the luxury of creating for the joy. Of course that is where it has stemmed from for me, but in my early painting days getting the money for materials to work with was an important factor in actually being able to leisurely produce the work I was so inspired to do. I was working in a small coffee shop when I picked up on painting for the first time in years. University had left me a trembling mess of an artist, the soul crushing deadlines and inspiration stifling guidelines to follow for your work to be valid within the perimeters of that semester’s course had left me not wanting to even look at a paintbrush again. I loved working at the coffee shop and had the opportunity to talk to so many people on laid back shifts or quiet mornings. I had talked at length to a regular about art which left me wanting to use what little money I had left that …

Motivation – The Art of Staying Inspired

The topic of motivation comes up a lot when your job is your hobby. There is a great argument for the need to keep work life and personal life separate, for the sake of your sanity and ability to relax. What do you do when your hobby becomes your way of earning a living, and your passion becomes a necessary daily thing. Does this make sitting down to work harder? If so in what way? Also, does working from home create problems with motivation levels when your are presented with oh-so many distractions? I am hugely lucky to be able to paint as my passion and my job, however some days motivation is slightly harder to find. Here is what I do. Go for a walk Nature is soothing. When I began painting for a living I lived in an area built up of rows of terraced housing in a small city. Nature was hard to come by unless you ventured to the outskirts, which I could not do at the time. I knew of …

‘Jaws’ – Shark Painting

I am very excited that my original painting ‘Jaws’ is being made into a limited edition print, with editions of 75. It is a privilege that this piece is endorsed by The Shark Trust, a wonderful charity. The misunderstood nature of sharks means that their demise as a species is hugely overlooked. Their importance within the marine ecosystem is of such huge importance to the health of our oceans. There are many threats to sharks that can have adverse knock on affects. The global decline of sharks can create a cascading effect. As one of the ocean’s top predators, sharks have potential to structure ecosystems in crucial ways. Decline can mean rearrangement of marine communities. One of the biggest threats to sharks globally is overfishing.  This is fuelled by a large demand for shark products such as meat and fins, cartilage, leather, teeth and jaws. Other threats include finning (the cruel practice of cutting off a shark’s fins whilst alive. Also, pollution and habitat destruction contribute to the hugely declining numbers. Climate change and pollution …