All posts tagged: modern art

An Artist’s Paint Palette

I love the way that a palette can never really be tidy. As an artist that does not have paint thrown everywhere, but has different liquids, brushes and materials all compartmentalised and all surfaces clean of paint, the one element that stays the same with all artists is that there is no neat way to maintain a palette of paints. The way I lay out my palette has become habitual rather than symptomatic of the colour palette or any functional order. I line the paints as a spectrum, originally because I thought it looked pretty. Take away the colour (greyscale photography) and I can see that different mounds have been more exhausted and spread around than others, I can see how little tone has to do with my arrangement and it makes me wonder what elements of my work might change if I were to pre-think my colour palettes and order the paints accordingly… Contemplating the palette gives a lot more away about the artist, and maybe about why their work in the way that …

King Fisher Charcoal Sketches

I LOVE charcoal! It creates such a beautiful contrast between soft blending and sharp marks. I used to use charcoal in all of my mixed media pieces, which is why I decided to revisit this material. I have finished my first of a set of sketches of large scale charcoal studies. The charcoal can be so complimentative to create the tonal qualities and pick up on the minuscule detailing of the feathers. The geometric shapes just seemed to fit… I really like this idea to bring something new to the sketches and almost a bit of compositional framing and imbalance, which I love. I am excited to create the next two, I have them all set up and ready to go! I am still deciding on the subject. Koi carps are a favourite of mine at the moment and could work beautifully…   Any ideas??    

‘Action Expresses Priorities’

    ‘Action expresses priorities.’ -Gandhi   On a busy week, I can clock up around 70 hours painting. Especially recently, with so many commissions as well as ideas I just can’t for the life of me hold off, I have to timetable my work and stick to it, and it pays off every time. I do this because I love painting, I am passionate about making good quality work. I am also business savvy and love organisation, lists and generally being busy. Proudly, one thing I never, ever am is bored. A friend of mine sent me an article, there was a long passage written by Richard Dawkins called, ‘To live at all is miracle enough’ (which I urge you to google) which puts into perspective greatly just how miraculous the universe is, how even just existing right now through such slim circumstance is such an underrated and unappreciated idea in itself. A bit of perspective never hurt anyone, those chats where you get lost in conversations of space going back too far beyond measure and …

Wildlife Art – Recent Oil Paintings – Birds

I have been focusing a lot more on my wildlife work lately! Trying out a few new subjects and styles whilst undertaking a huge commission of a painting that is 2 meters by 2 meters… My first ever original painting was of two birds in flight, one of my main and most popular subjects to date. (The second was a stag which has also been one of my most popular..) Therefore painting birds is something I have continued to do, only taking on new breeds and styles and ways of representing them. This, or finding new ways to represent my favourite breeds. As my work has progressed throughout the year I can see by looking along my own timeline of birds in particular and the way I have worked with them, just how much my painting technique has changed. I decided to do a new take on an old classic of mine. My first ever OIL painting was of an owl. This was such an incredibly popular piece, one of the most mentioned at my …

Using watercolours (From an oil painter’s perspective)

I didn’t realise how lucky I had it, to have thrown myself in at the deep end and learn to paint with oils as quickly as I did. It was a medium I wanted as my friend and I threw it around until I made it work. I was going to shoehorn my work to intertwine with oils and do whatever it took. Luckily the shoe fit. It wasn’t until I went back to materials I had previously used before I taught myself how to paint properly, that I realised it is not how the material works for you but how you work the material. Watercolour painting is oil painting flipped on its head. This is my own interpretation. Where oils are malleable, subject to complete change in consistency and shape of the mark you just made, watercolours are not. With oils you could alter that one mark up to 3 or 4 days later. With watercolours you cannot. You have a matter of seconds to decide if the mark you just made was ‘correct’ …

Lately…

Lately… Here are a few images of whats been going on lately! In between setting up my new place, working on commissioned work, original work, and as much wildlife work as possible for a new gallery taking on my work; I have had to fit in meetings and general life. Its been hectic. The Eden pieces are starting to come along well, the detailing has been building and starting to take form with intricate marks thrown in. I have been working just on the Eve piece mainly, establishing the embellishments and look of the pieces, and will start to add detail to the Adam piece to bring them both together. Eden started off blonde, then went brunette, then turned vibrant red. It seemed to suit her so much more!     This hummingbird piece will be available in The Little Red Gallery in the Bailgate in Lincoln very soon! It is currently being framed and I am very excited to see it complete and on the walls. For commission enquiries you are welcome to contact …

‘Phosphenes’

A word that finally makes sense of the ‘abstract embellishment’ I aim to create in my paintings – ‘Phosphenes’ phos·phene   (fŏs′fēn′) n. A sensation of light caused by excitation of the retina by mechanical or electrical means rather than by light, as when the eyeballs are pressed through closed lids. [French phosphène : Greek phōs, light; see phos- + Greek phainein, to cause to appear, to show; see bhā-1 in Indo-European roots.] The sensation when you rub your eyes and see colours and lights actually has a name. I remember doing this as a child and seeing a kalaidoscoptic range that didn’t actually exist, there was no presence of light, it is in fact a bit of a phenomena. On learning this word it made sense of my colourful detailing that I throw into my paintings, which before was described as abstraction. I felt there was more of an elegant and rich description for the marks I aim to make in my work . It was less about creating abstraction and more about ’embellishing;’ a word I use a lot when describing my work. I …