All posts tagged: abstract art

A bit of a thank you…

Recently I have been posting less often and not showing any current works of mine, I am currently working towards a fantastic opportunity that I have been hunting down for a while now, waiting and holding back for the right time and offer. This makes it more exciting for me to show you the work I have been doing when I can! And hopefully it won’t be long before I can clue you in on what is going on. Now is a great time to thank you (whoever is reading this, commenting, liking, following my Facebook, instagram and Twitter accounts, emailing and messaging me about my artworks.) It has been hugely appreciated right from the start when I began posting my paintings and the process along the way. Your encouragement served as inspiration to paint more and more. THANK YOU! ‚̧

HUGE Peacock Oil Painting – The Last Sessions…

SO CLOSE! But still a lot of fine details to go! This was a¬†particularly¬†fun session to have rounded the painting off with, involving music and stuffing my face with mini eggs. Black and white shows the detail well so I will save the full colour for the¬†finished piece. For anyone looking to paint at a large scale be prepared for a lot of clambering around.                 Look out for the next post which will show the final, finished piece!  

An Artist’s Paint Palette

I love the way that a palette can never really be tidy. As an artist that does not have paint thrown everywhere, but has different liquids, brushes and materials all compartmentalised and all surfaces clean of paint, the one element that stays the same with all artists is that there is no neat way to maintain a palette of paints. The way I lay out my palette has become habitual rather than symptomatic of the colour palette or any functional order. I line the paints as a spectrum, originally because I thought it looked pretty. Take away the colour (greyscale photography) and I can see that different mounds have been more exhausted and spread around than others, I can see how little tone has to do with my arrangement and it makes me wonder what elements of my work might change if I were to pre-think my colour palettes and order the paints accordingly… Contemplating the palette gives a lot more away about the artist, and maybe about why their work in the way that …

Progress Pictures – Stag Oil Painting

Recently I have been working further on my wildlife pieces.¬†After the great reaction to my ‘Galloping Horses’ piece I wanted to work more on an atmospheric element whilst integrating factors of the idea of ‘The Golden Ratio’ and detail and space in close proximity. I recorded my progress, as usual, with this particular stag piece of the 3 sessions I have done so far. This piece has taken into consideration my recently learned word¬†‘phosphenes’ (the sensation of a ring of light and colour as a result of pressure on the eyeball)¬†to bring about an abstract colour palette with glints of light as embellished detailing, also depicting beams of light on a forest floor. It is always useful to look back over the progression process of a piece, it shows how far it has come along, as well as what has been added in terms of atmosphere and general aura, over just likeness and realistic correctness. As for the subject, stags have been close to my heart since finding my footing as an artist. Stags have …

‘Phosphenes’

A word that finally makes sense of the ‘abstract embellishment’ I aim to create in my paintings – ‘Phosphenes’ phos¬∑phene ¬†¬†(fŇŹs‚Ä≤fńďn‚Ä≤) n. A sensation of light caused by excitation of the retina by mechanical or electrical means rather than by light, as when the eyeballs are pressed through closed lids. [French¬†phosph√®ne¬†: Greek¬†phŇćs,¬†light; see¬†phos-¬†+ Greek¬†phainein,¬†to cause to appear, to show; see¬†bhńĀ-1¬†in Indo-European roots.] The sensation when you rub your eyes and see colours and lights actually has a name. I remember doing this as a child and seeing a kalaidoscoptic range that didn’t actually exist, there was no presence of light, it is in fact a bit of a phenomena. On learning this word it made sense of my colourful detailing that I throw into my paintings, which before was described as abstraction. I felt there was more of an elegant and rich description for the marks I aim to make in my work . It was less about creating abstraction and more about ’embellishing;’ a word I use a lot when describing my work. I …