All posts tagged: portraiture

Ali Cavanaugh – Watercolour Artist

Out of so many artists whose work I find so compelling and inspiring, the watercolours of Ali Cavanaugh are one of my favourites.  One particular subject will always remain on my agenda because of what it means to get that subject right. This is figurative and portraiture. As humans we connect easily with a face, much like facial recognition technology, our brains similarly make connections and readings when we see a face. Faces are something we are almost too familiar with and in art if there is a mistake proportionately then it is clear to an onlooker in an instant. Proportion isn’t always the aim, abstraction artists often paint portraiture, there is so much to read that doesn’t always have to transfer immaculately across as clear as a photograph. Abstraction in portraiture can still capture other things,  we can gauge moods and emotions from slight turns in the many muscles that support the face. Whatever the style of work or agenda, with faces, something has to be ‘right’ for us to be able to relate. Portraits …

‘Life Imitates Art’

In the age old debate of what came first; the chicken or the egg, I find myself deep in a philosophical tangent inspired by a late night online shopping purchase. I bought a necklace that gives the impression of an elegant snake coiled around the neck. Unappealing to some, beautiful and ethereal to me. This internal debate reminded me of a quote from Oscar Wilde – ‘Life imitates art far more than art imitates life.’ My exact reason for clicking my purchase straight over to the checkout was because it reminded me of a painting I did in my last collection (The Phosphenes Collection) which depicted a bizarre image of two symmetrical women holding up snakes, which are coiled deliberately around their arms within the confines of the symmetrical intension. (Original piece shown below / ‘Serpens’ oil on wood panel) This is one of my stranger pieces, this and ‘Nectar of the Gods’ which I also hold an unhealthy emotional clingyness to even after sold and gone. The reason behind loving these stranger pieces is …

Second Collection of Original Oil Paintings with Wishbone Publishing / Katy Jade Dobson

I have been working recently on my second collection with Wishbone Publishing, a collection that I am incredibly   excited about. It has been a lot of fun to work on and showcases a lot of what I have learnt in the last few years as a professional artist. But above that I have injected mainly what I enjoy within this collection, the learning curve is palpable in the application and I love that it is raw and exposed in these original oil paintings. My work as always is selfishly about my process, my work thrives when my heart is fully engaged and I do not stop until the atmosphere is intimate and blatant. The success of my last collection was immensely unexpected and I am incredibly grateful to anyone who has supported my work over the last couple of years as I have found my feet. What I took from working solely on a full body of work is that your headspace during this period of creating can be temporary and down to circumstance. The …

Inspirations and Influences for Paintings – Working on my new collection.

I have been working on a new collection lately,  with an idea in mind that I wanted to be incredibly specific with… Without giving too much away,  I wanted to write about some of my influences in terms of colour and composition for my latest collection that I am currently working on with an insight into my favourite artists and images that have always inspired me. (Almost like a mood board of certain traits and aspects for this upcoming series of oil paintings.) Starting with colour and my favourite artist Odilon Redon – I learnt of Redon whilst working on a project at college where I imitated some of his works in oil pastels, his abstract tendencies and backgrounds specifically have been one of the most consistant inspirations for my work and hugely in mind when painting recently. I studied his cleverly positioned colour and admired how they looked so spontaneous. It wasn’t until learning this practice in oil paints and in my own style that I found that using a lot of colour all at once in …